1601 South 13th Road · Arlington, VA 22204

Sermon Archive

James E.  Victor, Jr.

James E. Victor, Jr.

Role: Pastor

 

The Reverend Dr. James E. Victor, Jr. carries out a long family legacy of Christian ministry. Like his grandfather, and others before him, Dr. Victor has dedicated himself to the pastoral ministry. Dr. Victor currently serves as the ninth pastor of the Mount Olive Baptist Church in Arlington, Virginia. Prior to his coming to Northern Virginia, he served the Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church in Clarksville, Tennessee, where he was involved in numerous community and university functions. Dr. Victor’s last appointment before becoming the under-shepherd of Arlington’s Mount Olive Baptist Church, was as the Associate Pastor of the historic home church of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the Ebenezer Baptist Church of Atlanta, Georgia. He was promoted to the Associate position from the Assistant Pastor’s position due to his commendable work in the areas of pastoral care, community outreach, and worship. At Ebenezer, Dr. Victor steered the church’s involvement in the I Have A Dream Project which was a model collaboration between churches and the business sector to ensure that a group of inner city second graders would be tracked throughout their school years and guaranteed the financial resources for a college education.

The Kentucky native was educated in the public schools of Hopkinsville, his hometown, where he distinguished himself both academically and athletically. Dr. Victor earned the Bachelor of Arts degree in History from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He further prepared himself for ministry by receiving the Master of Divinity degree with magna cum laude honors from the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia and the Master of Theology degree from the Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia. His thesis: Just Over in the Gloryland: The Recovery of Otherworldliness in Black Theology was well received by the Columbia faculty. Dr. Victor earned a Doctor of Ministry degree from Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC. Dr. Victor currently serves as the president of the Northern Virginia Black Pastors’ Council.

Dr. Victor was licensed and ordained by his home church the Moore’s Baptist Church in Kentucky. He is married to the former Vanessa Green and is the proud father of Candace Katherine Victor and Quinton James Victor. Dr. Victor enjoys reading, fishing and preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Latest sermons by
Sun, Apr 19, 2020
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
He is Risen and we rejoice! On this glorious Easter Sunday morning, our pastor takes his text from a passage of scripture that focuses on the fundamentals of Christianity. 1 Corinthians 15: 3-11 contain the “ABCs” of hope for believers. This back-to-basics sermon is just what we needed to quiet the gnawing skepticism that can diminish our faith and hope for brighter days. We first learn that we must make Jesus a matter of priority. Living a life led by Christ is the primary source of our hope. Even in the midst of this global, life-altering crisis, hope is not lost. Jesus loved us enough to die on the cross to save us from our sins. We in turn should make our blessed Savior our life’s greatest priority. Secondly, it is a matter of perspective. We know of Jesus’ death because the bible tells us he was crucified and buried in a tomb. Though Christ died on that old rugged cross, the gospel also tells us God raised him from the dead. Therefore, we know that even in death there is good news. In the midst of the devastating losses we hear of daily, goodness does exist. With the right perspective we recognize that God is at work. This can be a time to renew and restore relationships and rediscover what matters most in our lives. Jesus appeared to his apostles and followers after his resurrection, and he was present with them. Today, his presence is unleashed among us as well. We know that Jesus is real. How do we know since he does not walk among us? Well, we can feel his presence deep, deep down in our hearts. And that is why, my fellow believers, we always have hope!
Sun, Apr 19, 2020
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
He is Risen and we rejoice! On this glorious Easter Sunday morning, our pastor takes his text from a passage of scripture that focuses on the fundamentals of Christianity. 1 Corinthians 15: 3-11 contain the “ABCs” of hope for believers. This back-to-basics sermon is just what we needed to quiet the gnawing skepticism that can diminish our faith and hope for brighter days. We first learn that we must make Jesus a matter of priority. Living a life led by Christ is the primary source of our hope. Even in the midst of this global, life-altering crisis, hope is not lost. Jesus loved us enough to die on the cross to save us from our sins. We in turn should make our blessed Savior our life’s greatest priority. Secondly, it is a matter of perspective. We know of Jesus’ death because the bible tells us he was crucified and buried in a tomb. Though Christ died on that old rugged cross, the gospel also tells us God raised him from the dead. Therefore, we know that even in death there is good news. In the midst of the devastating losses we hear of daily, goodness does exist. With the right perspective we recognize that God is at work. This can be a time to renew and restore relationships and rediscover what matters most in our lives. Jesus appeared to his apostles and followers after his resurrection, and he was present with them. Today, his presence is unleashed among us as well. We know that Jesus is real. How do we know since he does not walk among us? Well, we can feel his presence deep, deep down in our hearts. And that is why, my fellow believers, we always have hope!
Sun, Apr 12, 2020
Passage: Luke 19:41-42
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
As holy week begins, on this sacred Palm Sunday, the pastor takes his text from Luke 19: 41-42, reminding us of the intense love Jesus has for his people. In sharp contrast to the clamorous celebration as he entered the city, Jesus is overcome with sorrow because the people were unaware. He wept foreseeing the suffering to come.

Because Jesus comes near, our pain and broken hearts are palatable to him. He feels what we feel because he is so full of compassion and he cares about us. We can be comforted knowing that he is always with us, and he is concerned about our struggles. Although we are currently practicing social distancing, let your tears flow not just for ourselves, but for others as well.

The Lord also sees our plight. Don’t you know he is aware of this current crisis? He is not turning away from us. He sees us teetering on the brink, trying to deal with this frightening, tragic pandemic, this new normal. His tears flow with ours because he sees the excruciating pain, the devastating losses and the mounting hardship.

Still, let us thank God for the good news. Not only does Jesus weep because he is near and he sees our struggles, he is the ultimate authority. He was over the city of Jerusalem, and even now he is over all of us. Though a compassionless leader does not weep with his nation, we know that sweet Jesus is crying and watching over us. In that we can be confident, and we can be hopeful. And we can rejoice, every now and then.
Sun, Apr 05, 2020
Passage: Psalm 46:1-3
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
The growing pandemic is causing a shift in our lives each and every day. Right now, more than ever we need a calming, reassuring word from the Lord. From Psalm 46: 1-3 the pastor preaches a sermon that engenders courage and pulls us back to center. How we are able to remain calm as this invisible enemy creeps across our nation? This passage of scripture gives us several clues.

Because God is our refuge, he will always protect us and give us shelter. In our hiding place we rest while dangers seen and unseen pass us over. In our quiet shelter we have an opportunity for greater introspection, prayer, and drawing nearer to him. As we draw him nearer, we can learn how to be of greater service in his earthly kingdom.

Have you ever noticed the calm demeanor of the strong even as vicious storms arise? They are strong because they know their strength comes from on High. God is our strength. We can draw on his strength and rest assured that he will see us through. In our weakness he makes us strong. The scripture tells us that God is a very present help in the time of trouble. We know this to be true by our own experience. Hasn’t he seen you through tough economic times, illness, weariness and uncertainty? Recall when God made a way out of no way. Though we may sometimes feel fearful, be very sure that God is able.

Sopranos sing melodies so sweet that we listen raptly to their soothing voices. But even the purest soprano is no match for the most magnificent melody maker of all. Our Lord’s infinite melody calms our spirits and allows us to live fearlessly as we weather this ominous, transforming time. His melody gives us peace, brings us together, and we can be, still.
Sun, Mar 29, 2020
Passage: Psalm 11:3
Duration: 1 mins 34 secs
Spring, the season of refreshing renewal and eternal optimism has arrived. However, some believers may be feeling varying degrees of pessimism because it seems their entire foundation is crumbling. So, our pastor focuses on Psalm 11, preaching a powerful, uplifting sermon to hold us steady in these unsettling times. His sermon helps to ease our fears and erase our doubts during this frantic, expansive crisis. And just as David asked in verse three, we must ask ourselves, “What can the righteous do?”

Well, God’s righteous people have to keep on believing. We know that God is still on the throne and is always in control. The believer keeps on worshiping no matter what comes to pass. We will not freeze, nor will we flee. We will stay in the fight because with God anything is possible.

The righteous maintain the moral high ground. While others are unraveling and exhibiting greedy, inhumane behavior during this unprecedented halt in our lives, the righteous show compassion and dole out extra doses of kindness. We can be the voice of reason, the listening ear, the encourager. We can be God’s vessels of hope.

At all times, the righteous must continue to pray. Engaging the Lord through prayer prepares us for whatever lies ahead. When we give our cares and worries to God, he will fix it. Do not fear. Pray, for this storm too shall pass. Prayer warriors, be brave, for prayer has the power to defeat any enemy that dares to harm the righteous of God.
Sun, Mar 22, 2020
Passage: Psalm 121:1-2
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
Especially, in times like these, we need a stabilizing, reassuring word. Taking his text from Psalm 12:1-2, our pastor provides just the right word, nudging us from anxious questions to bold declarations of faith. How, you may ask, are minds transformed from fearfulness to courageousness?

First, you must govern your gaze. If we keep a steady horizontal gaze, we can become fixated on the turbulence and uncertainty that surrounds us. However, when we choose to shift our gaze upward, we are looking to the one who helps us overcome the troubles of this world. Look up, for there you will find the Lord.

Secondly, when you personalize your perspective, you are taking control. A positive outlook and attitude result when our point of view is focused on God. We are not overwhelmed with feelings of gloom and doom. The Lord is mightier than this crowned virus that is currently wreaking havoc all over the globe. Worship him and ease your fears and anxiety, knowing that God will see you through. He is our divine protector and our healer.

Lastly, you must convey confidence in the creator. It matters not whether you believe God created something out of nothing, or you believe he created order out of chaos. Because he is the maker of heaven and earth, you can be confident that God can speak order out of any worldly crisis.

Oh, believers of waning faith, look to the hills for that is where our help comes from. Be assured that God is the answer to our existential questions based on worry and fear. Now is the time to declare and strengthen your faith in him.
Sun, Mar 15, 2020
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
This sermon, which takes its text from Mathew 15:10–20, teaches us the about the foundation of holiness, the basics of piety. Jesus’s profound lesson to his disciples makes it clear that we need not heed the teachings of transgressors. Those who reprimand for not adhering to their unscriptural teachings are not leading to holiness.

Here we learn that ritual cleansing is not how one becomes holy, for what goes in the mouth will soon be eliminated. Instead, what comes out of the mouth is indicative of the state of one’s heart. Holiness is observed in words spoken and behavior exhibited. A person who speaks words of encouragement, whose intentions are to be kind, show compassion, and ease another’s burdens clearly has a relationship with God. They are growing more dutiful to the Lord and doing his will.

We must pray not for the ability to religiously follow the practices and doctrine of the church, but for a clean heart. Oh, what a relief to know that giving up things in this Lenten season is not a requirement for piety. And, isn’t it good to know that even when we go astray, Jesus can fix our heart? His blood can make us new again, washing away our sin.

If you truly desire a heart for God, one that is pure, start with the basics of piety. The wisdom Jesus imparted to his disciples at Galilee will help to prepare you and strengthen you for a life of holy living.
Sun, Mar 08, 2020
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
As we remember the middle passage, honor our heritage, and celebrate our achievements, it is especially apropos that our pastor focused on scripture that emphasizes Jesus’ own unmerited suffering, and the hope his resurrection gives us as a people. His life provides us instruction for what to do in the face of our own suffering and sorrow. Jesus does not ignore crisis but confronts it immediately, giving correction to error. Calling out and facing demonic behavior is the right way to fix what is against God’s will. We must stir things up to change or eliminate systemic problems, ways of thinking and actions that are driven by the devil. In the scripture we see that Jesus protests the powers. Because we have the ultimate power on our side, we can be persuasive. We can demand that whatever is standing in the way of progress and our ability to carry out God’s mission, to move out of our way. Jesus commanded Satan to get in his right place - behind him. The only power the devil should have is to propel us away from him in order to live out the Lord’s purpose for our lives. Instead of focusing on earthly matters, Jesus refocused the fixation. Even in the midst of the struggle, we should be fixated on what the Lord has in store for us. Pastor Victor urged us to tap into our tiptoe faith. That is a faith that sees beyond real and present suffering. Tiptoe faith allows us a glimpse of brighter days ahead. Nobody knows the trouble we’ve seen, but we know because Jesus lives in us, we have hope and a future.
Sun, Mar 01, 2020
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
This passage of scripture, Matthew 21: 12-17, depicts Jesus as he is rarely seen. He is angry at the disturbing activities that are counter to his religion taking place in his house of prayer. Are we, like Jesus, angered by faith that fails to stand up against wrong? The sermon helps us discover if we too have good religion.

Good religion has prophetic tension. It finds injustice unsettling and does not hesitate to overturn the status quo. It calls out what has been accepted and deemed normal as the anomaly that it is. Religion that is good empowers the weak, enabling the disabled to overcome whatever silences and holds them back. It advocates for the voiceless. Religion that is good is strong enough to dismantle harmful institutions, and all people are treated with respect and are valued.

Being inclusive, and not exclusive is a cornerstone of good religion. If today’s shrinking churches were truly introspective, they may discover they are not welcoming and embracing of all of God’s people. Do they only desire members who are well-connected, prosperous, able-bodied, articulate and highly educated? Good religion reaches out to everyone.

Lastly, good religion always has a witness and is not intimidated by convention. It is not bound by those who sit in high places with unseeing hearts and minds. The establishment may not grasp what the Lord is doing right before their very eyes. Good religion erupts in unbridled praise when witnessing Jesus’s good and amazing works.

Though earthly powers may seek to suppress us, violating our humanity, isn’t it good to know that we can still love a religion that gives us hope and dreams? Now that, my beloved, is good religion.
Sun, Feb 23, 2020
Duration: 25 mins 2 secs
Today’s sermon is taken from Colossians 2nd chapter, verses 6 and 7. This month the pastor delved deeply into this scripture, assuring us that since we have chosen the Christian option, we are deeply rooted in Jesus, and we are built to last. Today, he tells us that because we are established in the faith, we are constantly being and becoming more like Christ.

As Christians we should always be eager to become even more established in the faith, seeking to grow in generosity, in loving, in kindness, and in our spirituality. After all, we have been bought with a price. The first way that we become more established in the faith is by adhering to the tradition. We know Christ’s teachings and we know what is right. Therefore, we must do what is right. Though we may at times fall short, we are to strive to embrace and love all of humanity just like our Savior.

Secondly, the text tells us we are to be abounding in thanksgiving. Ridiculous is the word the pastor uses to describe the vastness of our thanksgiving. In our greatest joy, and even our deepest sorrow we are to give him our outlandish thanks. As the song says, thank him for our mountains, and thank him for our valleys. We know that through it all he has never left our side, deepening our faith. He has been good to us, for he is good. And there is no way you can make me doubt him.

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Mount Olive Baptist Church

1601 South 13th Road
Arlington, VA 22204

703-920-7293

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